REVIEW: Carver: A Paris Story #2

(W/A/CA) Chris Hunt
Publisher: Z2

The second issue of Chris Hunt’s tour de force, from Z2 Comics goes some way to filling in some of the blanks posed in the previous issue as well as alluding to a potential reason for Carver’s recent trouble and appearance in Paris.

Carver is seems has a love in the city of romance, one that seems to be able to affect him, maybe even soften him.  It’s an opportunity for the reader to see that Carver was a man with the potential for hopes and dreams.  Of course, somewhere along the line bad things happened and quite possibly will continue to happen to him.

Chris Hunt is creator/writer/artist of the book and as such, he is in complete control.  There are some great storytelling tricks played in the first act of the book, before Hunt gives us some history.  I mentioned that some of the dialogue in the first book may have felt a little clichéd.  This problem doesn’t exist in this issue.  This could be due to Hunt’s growth as a writer or it may be that without a villain to monologue, Hunt may have caught a break.  Either way, the writing is a lot tighter this time around.  The scenes between Carver and Catie are done with a great deal of emotion.

The art in the book is of the same quality as the previous issue.  With so much emotion on show, negative and positive, throughout the book, Hunt does well to capture them.  That’s not to say that  this has turned into a romance book.  Far from it.  But the changes of pace during this issue come thick and fast and Hunt’s work doesn’t disappoint.

This issue is all about moving the story and the characters forward, which it does well.  There are enough hints dropped to ensure that readers will be assuming one thing, when Hunt may be able to deliver something else.  Whomever wins the assumption game, I know it will definitely be fun reading this Paris tale.

 

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