REVIEW: Star Trek #47

STORY BY Mike Johnson
ART BY Rachael Stott
COLORS BY Davide Mastrolonardo
LETTERS BY Robbie Robbins
COVER BY Joe Corroney
PUBLISHER IDW
RELEASE DATE Jul 22nd, 2015

So, we are back in reboot territory, with another classic story getting the new Trek re-working, this time it’s the Tholians. Now before I cause a warp core breach I will be honest, I haven’t been reading this series, mainly because, whilst I love Trek, I am not enamored with the J.J Abrams film series.

This is the concluding part of the current story and as such, there is a lot going on as the various threads get their appropriate conclusion. The Enterprise is in the web, saucer separation has occurred and the crew is suffering some odd effects from the web. Just a normal day at the office then.

The book is written by Mike Johnson, who is not only a major contributor to the Star Trek books, but is also an employee of Roberto Orci one of the writers of the films in which this licence is based on. As such the mood of the film is carried across well. At this point in his career, Kirk isn’t the self-assured version portrayed by Bill Shatner, instead he is being chased and cornered by his own self-doubt as much as by the Tholians. Unfortunately, there is a trap more insidious than the web or the mental issues affecting the crew. With various crew members incapacitated, including Bones, it’s up to Spock to save the day. Again! If Spock was able to do everything, as it appears he can, how do other star ships manage to survive without him? It’s the same sort of problem that ST: TNG has with Data and to some extent, JLU with Superman.

The art is provided by Rachael Stott whose main job seems to be ensuring that the characters look like their film version. If that is main criteria, she certainly hits the mark, as does the Enterprise. If there was room for improvement, it would be the figure work, which at times seems awkward.

Overall, for fans of the films, this would be a good read. For an old timer like me, I would prefer see new ongoing missions rather than a re-image of the classic episodes.

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