REVIEW: The Goddamned #1

The Goddamned #1
Written by Jason Aaron
Art by r.m. Guéra
Colors by Giulia Brusco
Published by Image Comics, Inc.

Cain…is The Godddamned #1 an issue that is suitable for children, the faint of heart, intolerant minds or anyone that might find religious-themed comic books offensive?

Consider yourselves warned!

Jason Aaron and r.m. Guéra have combined their creative talents to convey a distinct interpretation of events chronicled in the Bible’s book of Genesis. Their tale focuses on the time “Before the Flood” (as the subtitle on the cover of this issue indicates), an epoch where humanity was apathetic and unreceptive towards good will. Sympathy was an emotion that was severely lacking throughout civilization (is that any different from today’s society?). People favored malice over kindness and preferred to inhabit a bleak world where rampant bloodshed and carnage was routine.

The Goddamned #1 will provide you with the opportunity to perceive this dreadful and savage culture through the eyes of Cain, the first human born, the son of Adam and Eve – the world’s first murderer. His treacherous act of killing his younger brother Abel and lying about it to God, set the world on a path from which it could never turn back. Cain was cursed by God for his despicable actions and destined to roam the Earth as an undying spectator to all of the wickedness he helped to unleash.

Given the context and nature of the subject at hand, I expected more complexity out of the script Jason Aaron delivered. Don’t get me wrong, the story here was good enough to get me to commit to a second issue; however, there were numerous panels without dialogue which only served to speed up the pace while reading this book. I was somewhat perplexed by the colloquial speech exhibited by each of the characters as well as the placement of profane words. I won’t shy away from books that contain foul language…sometimes it does offer a dramatic and perhaps needed impact, but when I read a story loaded with vulgarity, I tend to become disinterested or numb to the message that is being expressed, especially if it lacks tact. Guéra’s artwork combined with Brusco’s colors were more than fitting for this gory biblical account and totally capable of leaving long-lasting impressions of absolute mayhem and sheer horror to seep into your mind. Their joint effort played a significant role in setting up the tone that this book will undertake while convincing us to be grateful we never lived during a time when chaos reigned supreme.

Until next time Crusaders!

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