MOVIE REVIEW: In View

Irish drama.  A Female Garda, Irish Police, has for the last 6 years been over drinking.  To the point that she is being tolerated at the station.  They will not allow her back out on the street because of her erratic behaviour.  Her colleagues are doing their best to ignore the behaviour, hoping against hope that the Officer comes back to the woman they respected, but there is something deeper going on with her life.  Something that they won’t talk about.

Irish films of late have been mostly amazing.  For many years we have either provided the world with lacklustre affairs or something of the highest quality, with nothing, nothing between the two.  But last year we had The Young Offenders, A Date for Mad Mary, and because most of the crew was Irish I count the amazing Viva.  Mind you we also had The Flag, which considering the talent involved in that, was just the most horrible thing that I’ve ever seen.  So where does In View fit in, it’s on the highest end of the scale.

Starting off this film is about mental health, but it does what I’ve always said, if you want to educate you have to entertain.  The ever unrolling story of why Ruth is drinking herself to death is one that many families have to deal with, it’s inevitable, we’re all going to have to deal with loss.  She goes through it alone, and again sadly a lot of people face loss and depression alone.  You are not alone, and you’ll be shocked with the amount of people who will be there to listen, trust Uncle Gar, he knows.  I have to review the movie now but please remember to talk about your sadness and depression it 100% helps 100% of the time.

The film has probably the best female performance from an actor I’ve seen this year.  Caoilfhionn Dunne nails the part of Ruth you believe every emotion that she’s going through, drinking to numb the pain of her loss.  The extent of the loss is revealed slowly to us through a wonderful way of storytelling.  You are going to find that it’s a slow paced film, but it works so well here, they want to tell the story of a woman who has lost everything that she has been told is the reason for life.  She drinks and drives, and if anyone says anything to her, she reacts in a violent way.  The supporting cast are all so subtly in the background to Ruth’s destruction, at times not knowing how to approach and other times trying to shock her out of her depression, it is realistic to show that while people want to help, they often don’t know where to start.

The reveal of the loss in Ruth’s life would make anyone react that way, to give up, and the fact that she’s lasted six years, even with drinking a lot, is a testament to her soul.  Ruth then makes a choice to end her life, and you see the visible change that I’ve experienced with people, they make the choice to leave this life and suddenly you get tricked into believing that they are coming around.  But it’s that choice to end their life that sets them, sets Ruth, into positive actions.  The whole psychological approach to Ruth’s character, not just the performance, but the writing and the direction around the entire film, is so realistic that it scares you.  I was genuinely scared, as I’ve said I’ve seen this in lost friends, and it came flooding back.  I was in tears, loving the entertainment, fearing the feelings that Miss Dunne was able to convey that I’ve experienced, and wanting more.  I’ll be honest and tell you about half way through the film, although I love this film, I wanted to walk out.  It’s a hard slap around the face seeing someone going through this on film.  The shock and destruction of the ending of the film shows that the film makers have more courage than most.  You have to entertain to educate and in that respect In View is perfect.  Look after your mental health, look after your life, we get one and it’s filled with ups and downs, but it’s beautiful and worth every single day.  This film is worth your time, worth your money, and may start a conversation.  That’s the only way that things will get better.

Director: Ciaran Creagh
Writer: Ciaran Creagh
Stars:  Caoilfhionn Dunne, Stuart Graham, Ciarán McMenamin, Gerard McSorley

See full cast & crew

 

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