REVIEW: Glitterbomb #3

So…if you kids recall, I was not exactly impressed with Glitterbomb #2, and the lovely creatures at Comic Crusader like to mess with me sometimes. Just kidding, I love those crazy cats.

This issue of Glitterbomb is way more cohesive and I am actually beginning to understand the concept of the story. Hollywood is fake and has a dark side yadda and then…there’s a super dark twist! The embodiment of this horrible Tinseltown nastiness! Ha-zah!

Back to the book: this issue was significantly better than the last. The story was a lot clearer, the characters were fleshed out, and the setting was one in which was easily understood. Jim Zub’s writing is simple, yet it gets the point across, though I do still feel like we’re going along a bit slowly with things. But perhaps there will be a reason for that in last issues.

I was terribly bored and unimpressed with the artwork all around in the last issue, but it shows what a dramatic difference a color change can make to a book, and that’s precisely what happens here with K. Michael Russell’s colors. They translate the time of day and mood a hell of a lot better than before, though they are still muted and dull. I’m beginning to understand the art style a lot more, though the line art of Djibril Morissette-Phan is still very simple and really only pops when we see a dramatic point in the story, which makes a lot more sense. The bits of the book where we see the sci-fi side come out are easily the winners, and greatly show what the artist and colorist are truly capable of. Let’s cross our toes that we will be seeing more of that as the story heightens.

So I’m significantly more impressed with this issue than the last, but it’s still not enough for me to be excited about it. I’m wondering how many issues it will take for the story to finally bud, and for now it seems like we’re seeing a lot of setting up of the story and characters. The cover is pretty interesting, and I love the pops of red to really set the hiding horror theme over the edge. Cover A is a lot more striking than the alternative cover, and I wish to see that kind of quality appearing in the main story soon.

Story: 3 Stars
Artwork: 3 ½ Stars
Cover: 4 Stars

Story By: Jim Zub
Art By: Djibril Morissette-Phan
Art By: K. Michael Russell
Cover By: Djibril Morissette-Phan

 

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